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  • katrina4384

We Asked, and the Community Answered.


We Asked, and the community Answered.

When friends or the community ask how they can help, are you always at a loss for ideas? Let's brainstorm ideas together.

Community Responses:

- When my mom was in her last week on Earth, the hospice nurse just brought me flowers, and they got me a card for my birthday; my mom passed two days after my birthday.

- Honestly, I know that when my mom was in later stages, I would decline what little help was offered because it was formed in a way that I didn’t know how to respond. Like: “What do you need?” Or “what can I do?” Which I have definitely said to people…but I am learning to just do. I will reach out and say, “I’m on my way to drop off some McDonald’s at your place, you can let me know what you’d like or I can get you some random things.” Hhaha! Also - continue to invite caregivers out. Please. They may say no every time…until they’re able to say yes!

- Interestingly, his family, doesn't ask me. Very few people do. If someone sees me trying to get him to or from our car a neighbor may ask but it's sad how many people in our families and not a peep....they just presume I'm ok. I'm 71 and it's not easy. I hope next week I can get into the caregivers zoom.....thank you for bringing this to the attention of all who don't know anything about it.

- I help clean because I know the ocd/anxiety for my friend with HD can determine how the day will go.

- Just be a friend! Invite them out or go to visit- this disease can be do isolating for both our HD loved ones and their caregivers. Even if its just to the local park or around the block.

- This is such a great question and so hard to answer. I think the biggest thing is not to tell someone, "If you need anything, let me know," because a stressed-out caregiver will rarely ask for help. So I think the answer is to just step in and do it. Bring that dinner that you think is a good idea, mow the lawn that looks like it is overgrown, buy that bag of groceries and drop it off, or show up and bring dessert and sit with the caregiver and see how they are doing, or finally show up for an hour to help, that may mean you sitting for an hour at the house so the caregiver can go for a respite walk.

- Just be a friend! Invite them out or go to visit- this disease can be do isolating for both our HD loved ones and their caregivers. Even if its just to the local park or around the block.

- The gift of time.. even just a little can go a long way. Sit and watch a tv show, walk/ roll around the block..every little makes a world of difference

- Honestly, just listening without trying to understand.

- I would love it if people in my life could help with things they are comfortable with. I don’t need help with my husband, I need help with the daily things that I just don’t have time for.

- It’s hard to ask, even when we need something, coming by with some groceries or helping by cutting the grass.

- It’s hard to get a break sometimes. I find it impossible to get any time to myself. We cannot afford to hire someone to sit with my wife, and she most certainly can’t be left alone. Hopefully, the family will step up soon.

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1 commentaire


loveyou.hatehd
02 nov. 2023

Showing up is priceless. Even without an agenda or request, there are ways to just be present for someone that is experiencing isolation and caregiver fatigue.

J'aime
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